We’ll Get Through This; Joanna Fuchs

Lord, our troubles
Are so great,
We don’t know what to do;
The price for our
Iniquity
Is finally coming due.

The world is crumbling
All about;
No safe place can be found.
Right is wrong,
Wrong is right;
The change is quite profound.

Lord, we need
Your guiding light
To lead us out of here;
We’ll focus on
Your Word, and prayer,
To take away our fear.

Temptations of
This dying world
We’ll rule out and let go;
Give our burdens
All to you,
Shed all worldly woe.

That’s how we’ll
Get through this, Lord,
Fixed on heaven above,
Assured of your
protection, help,
And everlasting love.

God bless you, all my darling avids

Poems for a Rainy Day

The Rainy Day; Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the mouldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.

My life is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
My thoughts still cling to the mouldering Past,
But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast,
And the days are dark and dreary.

Be still, sad heart! and cease repining;
Behind the clouds is the sun still shining;
Thy fate is the common fate of all,
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.

Spring Storm; William Carlos Williams

The sky has given over
its bitterness.
Out of the dark change
all day long
rain falls and falls
as if it would never end.
Still the snow keeps
its hold on the ground.
But water, water
from a thousand runnels!
It collects swiftly,
dappled with black
cuts a way for itself
through green ice in the gutters.
Drop after drop it falls
from the withered grass-stems
of the overhanging embankment.

By the Rivers of Babylon We Sat Down and Wept; Lord Byron.

We sat down and wept by the waters
Of Babel, and thought of the day
When our foe, in the hue of his slaughters,
Made Salem’s high places his prey;
And ye, oh her desolate daughters!
Were scattered all weeping away.

While sadly we gazed on the river
Which rolled on in freedom below,
They demanded the song; but, oh never
That triumph the stranger shall know!
May this right hand be withered for ever,
Ere it string our high harp for the foe!

On the willow that harp is suspended,
Oh Salem! Its sound should be free;
And the hour when thy glories were
ended
But left me that token of thee:
And ne’er shall its soft tones be blended
With the voice of the spoiler by me!

Auld Lang Syne; Robert Burns

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne?

Chorus:

For auld lang syne, my jo,
For auld lang syne,
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet
For auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll be your pint-stowp,
And surely I’ll be mine,
And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet
For auld lang syne!

Chorus:

We twa hae ran about the braes,
And pu’d the gowans fine,
But we’ve wander’d monie a weary fit
Sin’ auld lang syne.

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere,
And gie’s a hand o’ thine,
And we’ll tak a right guid-willie waught
For auld lang syne!

English

For days long ago, my dear,
For days long ago
We’ll drink a cup of kindness yet
For days long ago.

And surely you’ll have your pint tankard
And surely I’ll have mine.
And we’ll drink a cup of kindness yet
For days long ago.

And surely you’ll have your pint tankard
And surely I’ll have mine.
And we’ll drink a cup of kindness yet
For days long ago.

We two have run about the hills
And pulled the daisies fine
But we’ve wandered many a weary mile
Since the days long ago.

And here’s my hand, my trusty friend,
And give me your hand too,
And we will take an excellent good-will drink
For the days of long ago.

Cat and Mouse by Ted Hughes

On the sheep-cropped summit, under hot sun,
The mouse crouched, staring out the chance
It dared not take.                              
                           Time and a world
Too old to alter, the five mile prospect—
Woods, villages, farms hummed its heat-heavy
Stupor of life.                              
                                     Whether to two
Feet or four, how are prayers contracted!
Whether in God’s eye or the eye of a cat.

Short and poignant. Be blessed all my precious avids 👧💖

November for Beginners

Red, White but rarely blue

by Rita Dove

Snow would be the easy
way out—that softening
sky like a sigh of relief
at finally being allowed
to yield. No dice.
We stack twigs for burning
in glistening patches
but the rain won’t give.

So we wait, breeding
mood, making music
of decline. We sit down
in the smell of the past
and rise in a light
that is already leaving.
We ache in secret,
memorizing

a gloomy line
or two of German.
When spring comes
we promise to act
the fool. Pour,
rain! Sail, wind,
with your cargo of zithers!

November 1981

Hi everyone. I saw this and found it fitting. All across the world I know everyone’s getting into the Christmas/Thanksgiving vibe, even in South Africa our stores are starting to play Christmas songs and put up decorations on Christmas trees. I wish you all a blessed Thursday and enjoy this time for holiday vibes–be it summer vibes or winter snowbells.

God bless you all, my darling avidReaders.🐰👩‍💻

Guy Fawkes Night Poem

Effigy of Guy Fawkes

Remember, remember!
The fifth of November,
The Gunpowder treason and plot;
I know of no reason
Why the Gunpowder treason
Should ever be forgot!
Guy Fawkes and his companions
Did the scheme contrive,
To blow the King and Parliament
All up alive.
Threescore barrels, laid below,
To prove old England’s overthrow.
But, by God’s providence, him they catch,
With a dark lantern, lighting a match!
A stick and a stake
For King James’s sake!
If you won’t give me one,
I’ll take two,
The better for me,
And the worse for you.
A rope, a rope, to hang the Pope,
A penn’orth of cheese to choke him,
A pint of beer to wash it down,
And a jolly good fire to burn him.
Holloa, boys! holloa, boys! make the bells ring!
Holloa, boys! holloa boys! God save the King!
Hip, hip, hooor-r-r-ray!

How to Dissapear by Rae Armantrout.

1

You had been swinging restlessly
between the appearance of spontaneity
and the appearance of serious thought.

You had been changing lanes
after a glance
in a mirror honest about
its tendency to distort.

What choice did you have?

It was soothing to watch
wisps of smoke
from a nearby chimney
disappearing
one by one.

2

Do you like pulses,

ridges, ripples
stretching into obscurity?

Would you prefer a flicker
to a steady light source?

This one stutters
slightly,

hesitant,

as if it could hold something
in reserve

Hi all my darling avids. Here is your poem of the day 🙂 I think we all have days where we wish we could disappear. I hope you enjoy it and have a blessed day.

God bless 🙂

SHADES

by Esther Esuga; April 2014

An innovative, creative, calm serenity
A spirit of togetherness and humanism
A patient, peaceful, joyful emotion
Independence
Different shades of Turquoise

A new, fresh, hopeful place of rest
Healing
Natural
Growth and development
Success
Vitality

A joyful, happy warming effect
Energetic
Sunshine
Arousal of cheerful feelings and freshness
Great mental stimulant

A classy, luxury glitz of glamour
A confident, generous, self-work
A victorious , royal, happy-to-go-look
An abundant, shiny, excess extrovert
Sophisticated

Have a blessed Monday, all my darling avidReaders 🙂

Town Eclogues: Thursday; The Bassette-Table

by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

SMILINDA and CARDELIA.CARDELIA.
THE bassette-table spread, the tallier come,
Why stays SMILINDA in the dressing-room ?
Rise, pensive nymph ! the tallier stays for you.

SMILINDA.
Ah ! Madam, since my SHARPER is untrue,
I joyless make my once ador’d alpieu.
I saw him stand behind OMBRELIA’s Chair,
And whisper with that soft deluding air,
And those feign’d sighs that cheat the list’ng fair —

CARDELIA.
Is this the cause of your romantic strains ?
A mightier grief my heavy heart sustains.
As you by love, so I by fortune cross’d,
In one bad deal three Septleva’s I lost.

SMILINDA.

Is that a grief which you compare with mine ?
With ease the smiles of fortune I resign.
Wou’d all my gold in one bad deal were gone,
Were lovely SHARPFR mine, and mine alone.

CARDELIA.

A lover lost, is but a common care,
And prudent nymphs against the change prepare.
The queen of Clubs thrice lost ! Oh ! who cou’d guess
This fatal stroke this unforeseen distress !

SMILINDA.

See ! BETTY LOVEIT very à propos !
She all the pains of love and play does know,
Deeply experienc’d many years ago.
Dear BETTY shall th’ important point decide,
BETTY, who oft the pains of each has try’d :
Impartial, she shall say who suffers most,
By cards, ill-usage, or by lovers lost.

LOVEIT.

Tell, tell your griefs ; attentive will I stay,
Tho’ time is precious, and I want some tea.

CARDELIA.

Behold this equipage by MATHERS wrought
With fifty guineas (a great pen’orth !) bought !
See on the tooth-pick MARS and CUPID strive,
And both the struggling figures seem to liue.
Upon the bottom see the Queen’s bright face ;
A myrtle foliage round the thimble case ;
JOVE, JOVE himself does on the scissars shine,
The metal and the workmanship divine.

SMILINDA.

This snuff-box once the pledge of SHARPER’s love,
When rival beauties for the present strove,
(At CORTICELLI’s he the raffle won,
There first his passion was in public shown ;
HAZARDIA blush’d, and turn’d her head aside,
A rival’s envy all in vain to hide)
This snuff-box — on the hinge see diamonds shine ;
This snuff-box will I stake, the prize is mine.

CARDELIA.

Alas ! far lesser losses than I bear,
Have made a soldier sigh, a lover swear :
But oh ! what makes the disappointment hard,
‘Twas my own Lord who drew the fatal card ! —
In complaisance I took the Queen he gave,
Tho’ my own secret wish was for the Knave :
The Knave won son ecart that I had chose,
And the next pull my septleva I lose.

SMILINDA.

But ah ! what aggravates the killing smart,
The cruel thought that stabs me to the heart,
This curs’d OMBRELIA, this undoing fair,
By whose vile arts this heavy grief I bear,
She, at whose name I shed these spiteful tears,
She owes to me, the very charms she wears :
An aukward thing when first she came to town,
Her shape unfinish’d and her face unknown ;
She was my friend, I taught her first to spread
Upon her sallow cheeks enlivening red,
I introduc’d her to the park and plays,
And by my Interest COSINS made her stays ;
Ungrateful wretch ! with mimick airs grown pert,
She dares to steal my favourite lover’s heart.

CARDELIA.

Wretch that I was ! how often have I swore,
When WINNALL tallied, I would punt no more !
I know the bite, yet to my ruin run,
And see the folly which I cannot shun.

SMILINDA.

How many maids have SHARPER’s vows deceiv’d !
How many curs’d the moment they believ’d !
Yet, his known falshood could no warning prove :
Ah ! what are warnings to a maid in love !

CARDELIA.

But of what marble must that breast be form’d,
Can gaze on Bassette, and remain unwarm’d ?
When kings, queens, knaves are set in decent rank,
Expos’d in glorious heaps the tempting bank !
Guineas, half-guineas, all the shining train,
The Winner’s pleasure and the Loser’s pain ;
In bright confusion open rouleaus lie,
They strike the soul, and glitter in the eye ;
Fir’d by the sight, all reason I disdain,
My passions rise, and will not bear the rein :
Look upon Bassette, you who Reason boast,
And see if Reason may not there be lost !

SMILINDA.

What more than marble must that breast compose,
That listens coldly to my SHARPER’s vows !
Then when he trembles, when his blushes rise,
When awful Love seems melting in his eyes !
With eager beats his Mechlin cravat moves :
He loves, I whisper to myself, He loves !
Such unfeign’d passion in his look appears,
I lose all mem’ry of my former fears ;
My panting heart confesses all his charms ;
I yield at once, and sink into his arms.
Think of that moment, you who Prudence boast !
For such a moment, Prudence well were lost.

CARDELIA.

At the Groom-porter’s, batter’d bullies play ;
Some Dukes at Marybon bowl time away :
But who the bowl or rattling dice compares
To Bassette’s heavenly joys and pleasing cares ?

SMILINDA.

Soft SIMPLICETTA doats upon a beau ;
PRUDINA likes a man, and laughs at show :
Their several graces in my SHARPER meet ;
Strong as the footman, as the master sweet.

LOVEIT.

Cease your contention, which has been too long,
I grow impatient, and the tea too strong :
Attend, and yield to what I now decide ;
The equipage shall grace SMILINDA’s side ;
The snuff-box to CARDELIA I decree ;
So leave complaining, and begin your tea.

This poem and all it’s rights go to “https://www.poemhunter.com”.

God bless you all my darling avidReaders! Have a blessed Thursday 🙂